Annie E. Casey Foundation
KIDS COUNT News
May 2010
 
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KIDS COUNT Special Report on Reading Proficiency
Reading proficiency by the end of third grade is a critical benchmark in a child’s educational development. Millions of American children reach fourth grade without learning to read proficiently. On May 18th, 2010 the Annie E. Casey Foundation released a KIDS COUNT Special Report, Early Warning! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters. Read about why reading matters and what we can do to raise the bar and close the gap for all children in the new KIDS COUNT Special Report. To access full report, press release and national and state profile pages click here.
KIDS COUNT Data Center Updates
The KIDS COUNT Data Center has been updated to include early reading related data from the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). The following are highlights of recently updated indicators. Click on the links provided below or visit the Data Center to access the new data.
Reading Outcomes Problematic for Future Economic Success

In 2009, 68 percent of public school children in the United States scored below proficient level on the NAEP 4th grade reading test. Results vary by family income. Eighty-three percent of low-income children attending public schools scored below proficient level on the NAEP 4th grade reading test, compared to 55 percent of middle to high income children. Without getting children on track as proficient readers, the United States will lose an essential proportion of its human capital, putting the future of children, families and the country at risk. See the Education section in Data Across States to access national and state-level test score results.

New data for the nation as a whole and individual states include:
Students Who Repeat a Grade Are Less Likely to Graduate from High School

In 2007, 11 percent of school aged children repeated one or more grades since kindergarten. Data from the National Survey of Children’s Health also shows that the likelihood of repeating a grade increases as a child gets older with 13 percent of 12 to 17-year-olds repeating a grade compared to 9 percent of 6 to 11-year-olds. Students who repeat a grade are more likely to leave school without a high school diploma. This puts them on track for future economic distress. See the Education section in Data Across States to access national and state-level data.

New data for the nation as a whole and individual states include:
Access the Early Reading Profile for Your State and Nation
You can access early reading profiles for the nation and the 50 states on the Data Center. These profiles contain data for indicators included in the special report on reading proficiency. You can access profiles, rank data, create maps and charts on the KIDS COUNT Data Center
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KIDS COUNT, a project of the Annie E Casey Foundation, is a national and state-by-state effort to track the status of children and families in the United States. By providing policymakers and citizens with benchmarks for child well-being, KIDS COUNT seeks to enrich local, state, and national discussions concerning ways to secure better futures for all children.


The Annie E. Casey Foundation
701 St. Paul Street • Baltimore, MD 21202 • 410-547-6600
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